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What Does A Graphic Designer Do?

Expert Tips For What Does A Graphic Designer Do?

So, what does a graphic designer do exactly? Well, they design graphics.

Okay, thanks for reading! Bye!!

I am just kidding.

There’s SO much that graphic designers do.

Graphic designers create visual tools to support a brand’s ideas and messaging that influence and inform consumers. Their handiwork is everywhere you look! As the expression goes, art makes you feel something while the design makes you do something, and graphic designers do both.

A Day in the Life

Also known as visual designers and graphic artists, the particular role of a graphic designer can vary widely depending on the specifics of their project and client. They may craft the overall composition and production design for any media such as advertisements, logos, short-form video, product packaging, social media content, or corporate reports, and that’s just scratching the surface. A pretty general overview of a typical day for a graphic designer looks like… 

Setting the Day’s Workflow 

  • Daily tasks and expectations are established. They may be advised by the client and then assigned by any relevant in-house or agency project manager. It is essential for time management if freelancing. 

Reporting & Updating 

  • Communication is a must about progress updates and any check-ins for feedback on yesterday’s headway. Meetings may be had directly with the client or with project managers. Estimated finish dates will often be determined or updated, and clarification of direction may be needed.  

Research 

  • Many say that true originality no longer exists. There’s nothing unusual about a creator needing some inspiration to get started. Maybe it’s spending some time researching similar projects by other designers or getting some insights into the client’s intended market audience. Take a look at what’s trending lately or look into what’s unique about marketing within the current project’s industry. 

Drafting 

  • Time to put the research to work! Short projects may require rough drafts being ready in a matter of hours, while others may take several versions of proposals as the ideas are fine-tuned.  

Designing 

  • The designer incorporates the specific client-provided brand assets like the brand’s approved typefaces, hex codes for colors, logos, or any other cohesive elements to begin bringing the project to life. Be it Figma or Photoshop or Final Cut Pro, here is where it matters most that a creator knows what software will give them the best, most relevant results. 

Wrapping Up 

  • Has the file been saved and sent back to the client for review? Has a backup copy been made yet? Update the client once more on ETAs also before calling it a day!

Graphic designers utilize an impressive span of knowledge and skills.

A solid graphic designer must understand color theory, psychology, typography, design software, and visual elements and marry it all to each brand’s unique identity. They’ve got to be skilled at consolation and presentation, sales, HTML, analytics, infographics, storyboard creation, design strategy, task flexibility, interpreting aesthetics, cost estimation, font selection, spacing, ad design, photo-editing, proofreading, visual message integration, and everything in between.

This job is anything but simple!

With such a variety of skills, many graphic designers develop into roles like Art Production Manager, Brand Identity Developer, Logo Designer, all the way up to Creative Director; so many more happily stick long term with the job description they love.

Graphic designers combine art with tech.

Through a combination of technology and art, a visual designer’s goal is to enhance a brand’s recognition and ensure their visual message is consistent and accurate, marketing-wise. This usually starts with producing rough illustrations of design ideas, either by hand sketching or in the relevant creative software.

Nowadays, with the prevalence of digital tools, it’s not impossible to lack drawing skills and still be a graphic designer as long as there is a strong artistic eye and a good sense of design elements. Knowing just the basics of pencil sketching can be all you need for noteworthy creations, especially when it comes to graphics in UI/UX design and web development like that of Agency Partner.

Understanding the possibilities and limitations of media, like the responsiveness of an app or the physical material a graphic will be printed on, can make a massive difference in the scope of effective design. Much the same way drawing skills may be helpful but not intrinsic to good graphic design, coding knowledge isn’t a must but can smartly inform an artist’s ideas and ability to collaborate with developers when necessary. Speaking of…

Graphic designers stop, collaborate, and listen.

An intelligent graphic designer often collaborates with teams of programmers, analysts, marketers, copywriters, client executives, and even other visual designers to successfully render their final products. It’s beyond important that a graphic designer carefully listens and prioritizes to understand clients’ objectives and effectively strategize their designs.

While artistic sense and ability are essential, one of the best ways for designers to set themselves apart in this competitive industry is by strengthening client-related soft skills. Learning how to stay attuned to a client’s needs and effectively communicate through every step of the process can be the difference between ‘good’ and ‘great’!

Graphic Designers DON’T…

As important as understanding what a graphic designer does, we also need to understand what is mistaken for falling under their already extensive list of responsibilities. Graphic designers do not decide the brand identity, only how to help visually bring it to life effectively. While they may create stunning visual details within an app, the app layout itself doesn’t entirely fall under their job description. Need a map drafted for a new travel book? Got a marketing presentation due soon? Nope, not a graphic designer’s job either…at least not yet!

Working as a graphic designer can be stressful considering how many different tasks you may have to handle daily and how lightning-fast the industry trends and tools typically evolve. Branding has never been more critical than now, and skilled graphic designers are vital to its success and effectiveness. The graphic design job outlook is pretty rosy, too, with the job market for the position projected to grow 4.2% in the ten years between 2016 and 2026. From print to digital to motion graphics and more, this industry will never go out of style.